Antioxidants & Healthy Aging

 

Antioxidants provide the body with protection from potentially damaging compounds called free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive chemicals with unpaired electrons that steal electrons from other molecules, causing a vicious chain reaction that wreaks havoc on the body. Free radicals can damage the body’s tissues and may increase the risk of developing certain diseases.

Free radicals are normal by-products of metabolism, as well as environmental toxins like air pollution, cigarette smoke, radiation, heavy metals and pesticides.

Antioxidants provide preventive care to the body, protecting against the negative health consequences that can result from free radical damage. They scavenge or neutralize free radicals, stopping the free radical chain. Antioxidants can be found in a variety of foods, with higher amounts in plant foods. Many supplements are available on the market to help ensure the body receives an adequate amount of antioxidants daily. Some of these Traditional Antioxidants include:

• Vitamin C

• Natural vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol)

• Beta-Carotene (provitamin)

• Selenium

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Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
Advanced Antioxidant Complex (Item #158)

Outward personal appearance and beauty play prominent roles in society, evidenced by billions of dollars spent on personal care products in the U.S. It's well established that a healthy outward appearance starts at the cellular level. About every six weeks the top layer of skin naturally sheds, leading to new skin from underneath. The health of this new layer is reflective of one's everyday eating, drinking, and exercise habits. Environmental pollution and toxins also impact the skin's health. Because women represent a large majority of the health and beauty product target market, and since a recent Council for Responsible Nutrition survey found that females over age 50 constitute the largest portion of dietary supplement...Full Details

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
Alpha-Lipoic Acid 100 mg (Item #135)

Alpha-lipoic acid was discovered in 1951, and has long been recognized as a coenzyme needed to break down sugar for energy production. It was not until 1988 that researchers realized that not only is alpha-lipoic acid itself an antioxidant, but the body converts some of it to dihydrolipoic acid, which posesses antioxidant properties. The body is capable of making some alpha-lipoic acid, but in certain conditions, the body may be unable to make enough.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
Alpha-Lipoic Acid 300 mg (Item #159)

Alpha-lipoic acid was discovered in 1951, and has long been recognized as a coenzyme needed to break down sugar for energy production. It was not until 1988 that researchers realized that not only is alpha-lipoic acid itself an antioxidant, but the body converts some of it to dihydrolipoic acid, which posesses antioxidant properties. The body is capable of making some alpha-lipoic acid.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 100 mg (Item #198)

Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or CoQ10, continues to gain popularity. CoQ10 is a fat soluble coenzyme that is normally synthesized in the body. Most consumers supplement their diet with CoQ10 to help support cardiovascular health. The mechanism of action of CoQ10 occurs in the mitochondria of the cells, during the respiratory chain. Research indicates that CoQ10 may support heart health by supporting cellular energy production. Since CoQ10 is fat-soluble, it is important to take it with dietary fat or in a fatty acid suspension. This is offered in a fatty acid suspension of safflower oil.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 100 mg Vegetarian Capsule (Item #162)

Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or CoQ10, continues to gain popularity. CoQ10 is a fat soluble vitamin-like substance that is normally produced in the body. It can be found in all cells including the cell membranes, where it protects cells from free radical damage. However, levels naturally decline with age, and may be reduced further in the presence of statin (cholesterol-lowering) drugs or disease. Statin drugs inhibit cholesterol synthesis in the liver, but also inhibits CoQ10 synthesis. Most consumers supplement their diet with CoQ10 to support cardiovascular and nervous system health. The mechanism of action of CoQ10 occurs in the mitochondria of the cells, during the respiratory chain. Research indicates...Full Details