Antioxidants & Healthy Aging

 

Antioxidants provide the body with protection from potentially damaging compounds called free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive chemicals with unpaired electrons that steal electrons from other molecules, causing a vicious chain reaction that wreaks havoc on the body. Free radicals can damage the body’s tissues and may increase the risk of developing certain diseases.

Free radicals are normal by-products of metabolism, as well as environmental toxins like air pollution, cigarette smoke, radiation, heavy metals and pesticides.

Antioxidants provide preventive care to the body, protecting against the negative health consequences that can result from free radical damage. They scavenge or neutralize free radicals, stopping the free radical chain. Antioxidants can be found in a variety of foods, with higher amounts in plant foods. Many supplements are available on the market to help ensure the body receives an adequate amount of antioxidants daily. Some of these Traditional Antioxidants include:

• Vitamin C

• Natural vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol)

• Beta-Carotene (provitamin)

• Selenium

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Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 200 mg (Item #165)

Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or CoQ10, continues to gain popularity. CoQ10 is a fat soluble coenzyme that is normally synthesized in the body. Most consumers supplement their diet with CoQ10 to help support cardiovascular health. The mechanism of action of CoQ10 occurs in the mitochondria of the cells, during the respiratory chain. Research indicates that CoQ10 may support heart health by supporting cellular energy production. Since CoQ10 is fat soluble, it is important to take it with dietary fat or in a fatty acid suspension. This product is offered in a fatty acid suspension of safflower oil, and therefore does not need to be taken with food.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 300 mg Vegetarian Capsule (Item #163)

Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or CoQ10, continues to gain popularity. CoQ10 is a fat soluble vitamin-like substance that is normally produced in the body. It can be found in all cells including the cell membranes, where it protects cells from free radical damage. However, levels naturally decline with age, and may be reduced further in the presence of statin (cholesterol-lowering) drugs or disease. Statin drugs inhibit cholesterol synthesis in the liver, but also inhibits CoQ10 synthesis. Most consumers supplement their diet with CoQ10 to support cardiovascular and nervous system health. The mechanism of action of CoQ10 occurs in the mitochondria of the cells, during the respiratory chain. Research indicates...Full Details

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 30 mg (Item #197)

Coenzyme CoQ10 also known as ubiquinone, is an important component in the energy producing systems in the body's cells. It exists in the membranes of the mitochondria from where it performs its essential function on manufacturing ATP, and generating the energy needed by the human body. Research has shown decreased levels of CoQ10 in a variety of health concerns in both animal and human studies. It is hard to obtain adequate amounts of CoQ10 in the daily diet, so many people choose to take a CoQ10 supplement to help ensure adequate health.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
CoQ10 60 mg (Item #199)

Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or CoQ10, continues to gain popularity. CoQ10 is a fat-soluble coenzyme that is normally synthesized in the body. Most consumers supplement their diet with CoQ10 to help support cardiovascular health. The mechanism of action of CoQ10 occurs in the mitochondria of the cells, during the respiratory chain. Research indicates that CoQ10 may support heart health by supporting cellular energy production. Since CoQ10 is fat-soluble, it is important to take it with dietary fat or in a fatty acid suspension.

Antioxidants & Healthy Aging
Hot Flash Perimenopause Support (Item #467)

Over 80% of women will experience “flushing” or hot flashes & night sweats during menopause, these are vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as dilation and constriction of the blood vessels.  Most women rate their VMS as severe.

While most clinical guidelines suggest women will experience hot flashes from 6 months to 2 years of duration, more detailed and larger scale studes (2015 JAMA) shows the median total duration for experiencing VMS lasts over 7 years,

Perimenopausal women can prepare their circulatory system to better handle menopausal hot flashes.  Certain nutrients can improve capillary elasticity and nitrogen monoxide balance which enables the system to...Full Details